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The Best Roasts in London


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The Best Roasts in London

Sunday isn’t Sunday without meat and two veg, right?

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Looking for the best roasts in London? The search ends here. From fine dining at The Savoy to tucked away pubs, we’ve found the best roast dinners, with all the trimmings, in the capital.

     

The Best Roasts in London, 2019

When it comes to Sunday lunch with a view, they don’t come much better than Oblix West at the Shard. Check out the open kitchen on route to your table to see what takes your fancy, but be sure to start with your meal with an excellent bloody mary. You may want to dive straight into the main (the roast here is pretty sizeable) but if you do want something to start, the aubergine flat bread is our pick. Book early for a table by the window and settle in for a long and leisurely lunch with all the trimmings.

Hero dish: The rib of beef is perfectly cooked but the surprise hero was the creamy mash, that threw the roast potatoes into the shade.

Roasts are funny, aren’t they? While most dishes in a good restaurant are infinitely better than anything you could make at home, one always suspects with a roast that your mother might have done it better. Not here. At the Bull & Gate, the potatoes are fabulous, the Yorkshire puddings are tall and proud, the Limousin X beef (what a name!) is lovely, deathly rare in the middle, yet roughly charred on the outside. Read Joseph Bullmore’s review in full here.

Hero dish: The aforementioned beef is finished perfectly with homemade horseradish sauce.

READ: The 10 best restaurants for modern British cuisine

What Neil ‘king of the barbecue’ Rankin doesn’t know about cooking meat isn’t worth knowing, so we don’t need to tell you that his take on the Sunday roast, cooked over an open flame, is going to knock your socks off. The smell of the leeks and shallots roasting over coals will have you salivating from the moment you walk through the door. Extra bonus points for being the only roast that starts with a round of tacos.

Hero dish: This is the best cauliflower cheese in town. Forget tasteless milky mess, this is smoky, cheesy, gloopy goodness.

If it’s glitz and old-school glamour you seek for your ultimate Sunday roast in London, check into the Savoy Grill for a lunch date to remember. You’ll be presented with the dish of the day on the silver trolley; Sunday means rib of Hereford beef and Yorkshire pudding. Allow the sommelier to recommend the perfect accompaniment to your meal and remember to start with bubbles; after all, this is not your everyday beef dinner.

Hero dish: Nothing polishes off a delicious roast dinner quite like sticky toffee pudding. As you’d expect, the Savoy’s take is absolute perfection.

After a hiatus, the roast has returned to The Jones Family Kitchen, a gorgeous Belgravia restaurant located in the new wellbeing hub, Eccleston Yards. Sister venue to The Jones Family Project in Shoreditch, it hit the ground running in May last year and is now in the run-up to its first birthday. If you remember just one thing about The Jones Family Kitchen, it should be that they know how to cook meat that melts in your mouth. Renowned for their Josper grilled steaks– which should be consumed dripping in red wine beef jus and scoffed with truffle macaroni cheese for the full luxurious experience and foodie memories that’ll last for weeks – it’s safe to say that the Beef picaña is a roast dinner winner. All their meat is sourced from , who farm their contented free-range animals up north in Yorkshire. Plus, each roast is served alongside duck fat roast potatoes, honey roast parsnips, seasonal greens, Yorkshire puddings and gravy. From £25 for two courses, it’s good value too. A special shout out must also go to their lovingly and cleverly curated wine menu – they have incredibly knowledgeable staff and a well recommended red will round your meal off to perfection.

Hero dish: The succulent beef pinchana, chosen for its tenderness and rich flavours.

For an alternative to the standard meat and two veg, fine dining restaurant will be turning the traditional roast dinner on its head with a new menu each month. Head Chef Ben Murphy will be introducing a new series of Sunday-only tasting menus, starting with a five-course Roast Chicken with a twist which will utilise everything from the eggs to the bones.

Hero dish: We’re looking forward to March to try the 100-Day Aged Tartare as part of the five-course beef menu.

This restaurant overlooking Borough Market is named after what it does best, a good old-fashioned with top-notch ingredients. This is the place to go if you don’t want to wait until Sunday – they have different roast meat and fish specials every day to keep things interesting. But the Sunday menu still reigns, with three courses for £39.50 per person including some of the best beef and Yorkshire puddings we’ve had.

Hero dish: The potatoes are perfectly cooked every time – try the cheese and truffle fries for a treat.

Tucked away behind Queens Tennis Club, this cosy West London pub is the perfect choice if you prefer the comfort of a home-cooked roast, without actually turning on the oven. As you’d expect from any decent London watering hole, the accompanying tipples are worth trying; if you’ve had a heavy night try the Bailey’s Iced White Flat on for size. Choose from the rump of beef, half roast chicken or roast pork belly.

Hero dish: The Yorkshire pudding is just as good as mum’s. (Although obviously you won’t tell her this.)

If the second must-have on your check-list is quantity, (after quality, naturally) you will be pleased to hear that the key word in OXBO’s Sunday roast offering is ‘bottomless’. That’s right, a bottomless Sunday roast is the order of the day, with unlimited buffet starters and desserts, bookending a civilised at-table roast. You can even throw unlimited prosecco into the mix, should you choose. The main event is rotated between the likes of Josper-roasted cod and grilled corn-fed chicken.

Hero dish: The roast sirloin of Gloucestershire beef is perfectly done. The salted caramel cups on the dessert table are a favourite, too.

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Classic gastropub goodness is the order of the day in this lovely pub in the heart of Chelsea. Keep things simple with an all-the-trimmings roast and a hearty sticky toffee pudding to finish. Oh, and a pint on the side, please.

Hero dish: If pork is your favourite roast, get down to The Pig’s Ear asap.

You already know and love Hawksmoor for their steak, but check out their roast offering when you get the chance and you’ll be suitably impressed. Add an array of their famous sides and don’t forget to try their duck-fat potatoes and tasty onion gravy.

Hero dish: The beef. Obviously.

Lady A takes its name from a sassy, strong and caring landlady from the neighbourhood. Visit this new joint for its take on pub food inspired from around the world. Iconic roasts have vegetarian options and an array of both traditional and unique gravy options. The stand out feature of this roast, however, is the bottomless Yorkshire pudding. Such unlimited carbs is always good news.

Hero dish: Yorkshire pudding(s) – emphasis on the plural.

London’s first and only Michelin-starred pub, Fulham’s Harwood Arms knows quality. Big portions of perfectly cooked meat are the star of the show here: sumptuous seasonal specials like roast red legged partridge, beef rump with bone marrow and honeyed venison. But it’s not all about the meat – sides are lavish and cooked with flair. Think crispy beef-fat roasted potatoes, glazed parsnips and cauliflower cheese croquette, topped off with tasty bone marrow gravy. It’s a pricier option (£41.50 for two courses and £49.50 for three) but definitely worth it.

Hero dish: If you’re a fan of game, this is the place for you.

If you’re really hungry, subterranean Soho chop house is sure to satisfy. Nab one of the long sharing tables and go for the All-In option (£20 per person): a hefty sharing platter of beef, lamb, pork and all the trimmings. Sides include massive Yorkshire puddings, cauliflower cheese, crispy roast potatoes, seasonal vegetables and a large boat of gravy. Not one for the faint-hearted!

Hero dish: Being a chop house, it’s not surprising the succulent, medium-rare chops are the star of the show.

Spice up your Sunday with an Indian-style roast at small plates restaurant Kricket, which is now served at both their Brixton and Television Centre venues after launching last year. The menu changes on a weekly basis, but sample dishes include large joints of meat roasted with spices such as Keralan Beef Rump Cap, tandoori Afghani Poussin or Kori Spiced Mushrooms as a vegetarian alternative. Trimmings are also given a Kricket twist: think roast potatoes flavoured with curry leaves, paratha flatbreads oiled with beef fat, and hung yoghurt with mustard oil instead of gravy, or a spiced bread sauce. Spare yourself the hangover and swap the red wine for a Mango Lassi or a soothing Chai tea.

Hero dish: Order lots of the spicy roasties.

Recently opened Marylebone pub The Royal Oak, headed up by former Executive Chef at Duck & Waffle Dan Doherty, serves up a sumptuous traditional Sunday roast. For meat-eaters, offerings include a succulent 7-hour roast lamb shoulder, Hereford beef and free range chicken, and for veggies there’s a tasty stuffed roast pumpkin served with fig, chestnut and leek stuffing. All roasts come with huge Yorkshire puds, crispy roasties, green vegetables and roasted carrots, and the pub has a friendly, relaxed ambience – perfect for a cozy Sunday afternoon.

Hero dish: The beef.

     

Enjoy beautiful views of the River Thames as you tuck into an Italian-style roast at Battersea’s Fiume, headed up by Francesca Mazzei. The menu changes weekly, but meat dishes take centre stage here: think succulent whole roast guinea fowl with spicy Calabrian ‘nduja; tender leg of lamb cooked with salty anchovies; and rare roast beef served with yoghurt and horseradish sauce, paired with sides like pale-pink wilted radicchio, oven roasted swede and cavolo nero.

Hero dish: The lamb is cooked to perfection – and be sure to save some space for the Fiume house classic: a deliciously indulgent chocolate and pistachio doughnut.

Found opposite in Herne Hill, The Florence is perfectly placed for a big roast after a long walk round Brockwell Park. It’s a lovely pub – spacious and airy, with wooden floors, exposed brick walls and a garden, the kind of place you’d want to spend a leisurely Sunday afternoon. Their roast is traditional done really well: generous portions of meat (or vegetarian alternatives) served with roast potatoes, Yorkshire puddings, honey glazed roots and seasonal greens. If you can manage it, the sticky toffee pudding is heavenly.

Hero dish: The pork belly.

Off-the-beaten-track gastropub The Gun is a bit of a walk from Canary Wharf, but it’s well worth going slightly out of your way for. Perched right on the Thames, the stylish pub boasts lovely views of the 02 and Greenwich – particularly from its waterside terrace, which fills up quickly during the summer months. Despite undergoing a lengthy refurbishment last year, The Gun maintains its history and heritage, with long-cherished features such as open fires and wooden panelling. Most importantly, the food is great: succulent meats are paired with whole grain mustard cabbage, garlic roast carrots, buttered kale, roast potatoes and roasted cauliflower gratin.

Hero dish: The whole sharing Suffolk free range chicken, which comes with pigs in blankets and Yorkshire puddings. What more could you want?

What’s on this week? Find out in our culture diary / A Guide to London’s Oldest Pubs

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